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Research

This section will reference research that has been published relating to PRRS and other airborne pathogens. Please click on the links below to see an introduction to the published articles.

Links to Articles/Abstracts:
 

  • Long-distance airborne transport of infectious PRRSV and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae from a swine population infected with multiple viral variants. Otake S, Dee S, Corzo C, Oliveira S, Deen J.
     
  • Further assessment of air filtration for preventing PRRSV infection in large breeding herds. S. Dee, G. Spronk, D. Reicks, P. Ruen, J. Deen
     
  • Prevention of PRRSV infection in large breeding herds using air filtration.  G. Spronk, S. Otake, S. Dee

     

    Click here to view the entire article.

     Prevention of PRRSV infection in large breeding herds using air filtration.  G. Spronk, S. Otake, S. Dee

     

    Click here to view the entire article.

    DUE to the potential for long-distance airborne transport of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the filtering of incoming air to pig facilities located in dense regions of production has been proposed as a means to reduce this risk (Dee and others 2009a, Pitkin and others 2009). Those investigators used a model of a pig production region to document the airborne transport of PRRSV to a distance of 4.7 km and to demonstrate the ability of air filtration to protect naive populations of pigs from airborne PRRSV for a period of one year

     Long-distance airborne transport of infectious PRRSV and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae from a swine population infected with multiple viral variants.  Otake S, Dee S, Corzo C, Oliveira S, Deen J.

    Swine Disease Eradication Center, University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, 1988 Fitch Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA.
    Abstract: Airborne transport of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M hyo) has been reported out to 4.7 km.  This study attempted to determine whether this event could occur over longer distances and across multiple viral variants.  To accomplish this goal, a mixed infection of 3 PRRSV variants (1-8-4, 1-18-2 and 1-26-2) and M hyo 232 was established in a source population of growing pigs.  Over 21-day period, air samples were collected from the source population and at designated distances from the herd.  Samples were tested for PRRSV RNA and M hyo DNA by PCR and if positive, further characterized.  In exhaust air from the source population, PRRSV and M hyo were detected in 21 of 21 and 8 of 21 air samples, respectively.  Five of 114 (4.4%) long-distance air samples were positive for PRRSV and 6 of 114 (5.2%) were positive for M hyo.  The 5 PRRSV-positive samples were collected at 2.3, 4.6, 6.6 and 9.1 km from the herd.  All contained infectious virus and were >99.2% homologous to PRRSV 1-8-4.  No evidence of PRRSV 1-18-2 or 1-26-2 was detected in long-distance samples.  All 6 M hyo-positive samples were 99.9% homologous to M hyo 232 and 3 samples (collected at 3.5, 6.8 and 9.2km from the herd) were infectious.  These results indicate that airborne transport of PRRSV 1-8-4 and M hyo 232 occurs over longer distances than previously reported and that both pathogens remained infectious. Click here to view the entire article.

     

    Further assessment of air filtration for preventing PRRSV infection in large breeding herds.  S. Dee, G. Spronk, D. Reicks, P. Ruen, J. Deen 


    Click here to view the entire article. 

    THE filtering of air entering pig housing has been proposed as a means to reduce the risk of airborne transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from infected herds to at-risk populations (Pitkin and others 2009). To test this intervention, a pilot study was recently conducted in large breeding herds in regions of southern Minnesota and northern Iowa, USA, with a high density of pigs (Spronk and others 2010). Although this study generated very promising results, it was limited by both the sample size and the study period, as it involved only two filtered (treatment) and five non-filtered (control) herds and was conducted over a period of only one year. Therefore, to test this intervention further, a larger study was conducted using 10 treatment herds and 26 control herds over a period of 24 months.  

    Evidence of long distance airborne transport of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and

    Abstract

    The ability of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) to be transported over long distances via the airborne route was evaluated. A source population of 300 grow-finish pigs was experimentally inoculated with PRRSV MN-184 and M. hyopneumoniae 232 and over a 50-day period, air samples were collected at designated distances from the source herd using a liquid cyclonic collector. Samples were tested for the presence of PRRSV RNA and M. hyopneumoniae DNA by PCR and if positive, further characterized. Of the 306 samples collected, 4 (1.3%) were positive for PRRSV RNA and 6 (1.9%) were positive for M. hyopneumoniae DNA. The PRRSV-positive samples were recovered 4.7 km to the NW of the source population. Four of the M. hyopneumoniae positive samples were obtained at the NW sampling point; 2 samples at approximately 2.3 km and the other 2 samples approximately 4.7 km from the source population. Of the remaining 2 samples, one sample was obtained at the SE sampling point and the other at the SW sampling point, with both locations being approximately 4.7 km from the source. The 4 PRRSV-positive samples contained infectious virus and were > 98.8% homologous to the MN-184 isolate used to inoculate the source population. All 6 of the positive samples were 99.9% homologous to M. hyopneumoniae 232. These results support the hypothesis that long distance airborne transport of these important swine pathogens can occur.

     

What the experts are saying…

Dr. Scott Dee

The data is fairly self explanatory. Two  of ten filtered herds broke with PRRS, due to non-filter breaches, over a two year period of time ending September 2010.  In the non-filtered control group, 24 of 26 herds broke with PRRS in that same period of time.

Dr. Scott Dee, Veterinarian Specialist

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